Are we clear? Explaining what happens with personal data in online media

Written by Ine van Zeeland, Heritiana Ranaivoson & Luciano Morganti

In the beginning of 2019, the French Data Protection Authority (CNIL) handed Google a 50 million Euro fine for not properly explaining the consequences of its profiling activities. Professionals in the media and advertising industries pricked up their ears. While enforcement actions unnerve many in the media sector, underlying justifications provide clarity on the interpretation of contested provisions in data protection legislation. Clarity is sorely needed.

 

‘Lack of clarity’ emerged as the main theme with regard to personal data protection in a roundtable discussion organized in February between stakeholders in the Belgian media sector (news media, telecom providers, consumer advocates, academia, regulators, law firms, ad tech, and intermediaries). Interpretations of requirements differ between companies, between companies and consumers/users, and between regulators and companies. The consequence of this is that nobody knows for sure what is allowed and what is not.

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Journalism in the Digital Storm

Written by: Bianca Manelli, Chantal Cocherová, Georgios Evgenidis, Jiahuan He, Lara Corrado, Suhasni Midha, Yuliia Hladka, Zeynep Atilgan Ozgenc, Luciano Morganti & Heritiana Ranaivoson

What is news? What makes somebody a journalist? In the era of social media and blogs, the answers to these questions are not as clear as they were 10 years ago. With professional journalism still struggling to work through the digitalization of media, the rise of citizen journalism challenges the definition of both news and journalist.

With a few tools at disposal, a smartphone and a taste for news, an internet connection, a Twitter account and a good bunch of followers, if somebody tweets from a social movement, a demonstration or a fire, they can make an online trend. But, does any reported information qualify as news? Does this tweeting activity make them journalists?

According to the American Press Institute, journalism is the activity of gathering, assessing, creating, and presenting news and information. Following this general definition, anyone with a smartphone and social media account could technically do journalistic activities.

Is this definition sufficient to capture journalism? In the digital era, journalism needs to be redefined in order to account for how news and journalist as a profession have evolved in the last years.

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#5GMediaRoad – How and when will 5G impact the media sector?

The next generation for mobile communication, 5G, promises a wide range of new solutions to all sectors, including that of the media and creative industries. And indeed, 5G has the potential to substantially impact media production workflows as well as media services for the consumers.

On 8 and 9 May 2019, roughly 150 broadcast experts and decision makers focusing on media production and on content distribution as well as media innovation managers and researchers met at IRT in Munich to discuss opportunities and challenges for specific 5G-related use cases within their domains. In addition, different operational models for 5G networks were discussed together with potential regulatory challenges. The event provided an in-depth overview of different scenarios and solutions for 5G.

The participants widely agreed, that 5G is expected to soon play a key role in the production as well as in the distribution of media services. At the same time, it became apparent how crucial the early and open collaboration between the different players in the market is. Only if manufacturers, infrastructure operators and equipment providers fully understand the needs of the media industry, it can be assured that 5G will become a success. Collaborative R&D projects like the ones funded by the EU under the 5G-PPP framework as well as numerous national initiatives play a key role in this process. Eventually, there’s a mutual interest that 5G will efficiently support the wider rapid evolution of the audiovisual media landscape and the ways consumers access content.

The four key promises for the media domain are: increased flexibility, lower cost, higher reliability and better quality of experience. If these goals can be met, all involved parties will profit.

Please find a detailed summary of presentations and discussions in the article below. All presentations can be found at https://www.irt.de/en/news/symposia-and-workshops/review/5g-mediaroad2019/

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France Télévisions’ “Compositeur Digital” Sandbox project with Excense obtains MediaRoad’s Quality Label

MediaRoad assigned the Quality Label to France Télévisions’ Sandbox “Compositeur Digital” Project, created by the Excense start-up, started in September 2018. See https://www.mediaroad.eu/prize-development-and-quality-label for information about the MediaRoad’s Quality Label.

In September 2018, France Télévisions introduced a new concept for live presentations of news on its channels. Journalists are now able to manipulate on a large touch screen their presentation contents such as pictures, videos or even 3D models while delivering their explanations and being filmed in close up. With natural gestures, the presenter can move, zoom in or hide content to improve clarity for viewers.

This approach emphasizes the journalist’s expertise and creates a powerful engagement with our audience.  The solution is now used on a daily basis on France Info TV but also on the evening news on France 2 (main channel).

The Compositeur Digital software is developed by Excense, an awarded startup with activities with industry leaders of the French Stock Market and US companies.

Their product has been rapidly adopted by our community of journalists for its ease of use and visual impact, helping us create a new standard in broadcast journalism in France.

More info

Start-up website: http://www.excense.fr/en/index.html

Email: contact[AT]excense.fr

Project description on MediaRoad site 

Sandbox: France Télévisions Lab