Artificial Intelligence: the European Commission outlines a European approach to boost investment and sets ethical guidelines

by Guenaelle Collet

Europe has world-class researchers, laboratories and start-ups in the field of AI. The EU is also strong in robotics. However, fierce international competition requires coordinated action for the EU to be at the forefront of AI development.

On 25 April, the European Commission published a series of measures to boost Europe’s competitiveness in the field of AI. The Commission’s approach is three-fold: it aims to increase public and private investment in AI, prepare for socio-economic changes, and ensure an appropriate ethical and legal framework.

On the financial support front, the Commission is increasing its investment to €1.5 billion for the period 2018-2020 under the Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme.

As regards socio-economic challenges and changes to the job market, the Commission is encouraging Member States to modernise their education and training systems and support labour market transitions. The Commission will also directly support business-education partnerships to attract and keep more AI talent in Europe and set up dedicated training schemes with financial support from the European Social Fund. Proposals under the EU’s next multiannual financial framework (2021-2027) will also include strengthened support for training in advanced digital skills, including AI-specific expertise.

As regards ethical and legal frameworks, the Commission would like to set standards for market players in the EU and position the EU industry on the global scene

It is soon to appoint a High Level Expert Group (HLEG) that will steer the work and contribute towards drafting ethical guidelines on AI developments by the end of 2018. Those guidelines should be based on the EU’s Charter of Fundamental Rights, taking into account principles such as data protection and transparency, and building on the work of the European Group on Ethics in Science and New Technologies. To help develop these guidelines, the Commission will bring together all relevant stakeholders in a European AI Alliance. Parallel discussions on ethical guidelines are ongoing at G7 level.

Moreover, in order to further create an environment that stimulates investment, the Commission is proposing legislation to open up more data for re-use and measures to make data sharing easier. This covers data from public utilities and the environment as well as research and health data.

On 10 April, 25 Member States expressed their support for such EU positioning by signing a Declaration of cooperation on AI. The composition of the HLEG is expected to be announced in the end of May.

The media sector calls for a dedicated funding scheme to support innovation and creativity in Europe

Press release

BRUSSELS, 24 MAY 2018 

Two leading EU-funded media projects, I3 and MediaRoad, gathered today representatives from the European Parliament, European Commission and media organisations to discuss the challenges facing media innovation and the need for a common programme within the next European Financial Framework. The event was hosted and supported by MEP Dr. Christian Ehler, co-chair of the Intergroup of Cultural and Creative Industries (CCIs).

During the debate, the sector highlighted its needs to foster media research and innovation in Europe and ensure its competitiveness, jointly calling for a dedicated funding programme integrating technology innovation and creativity in Europe.

By creating an open and horizontal innovation scheme, the EU could bridge the existing gaps between technological innovation, creative content production

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The Future of Media Innovation in the EU Research Agenda post-2020

On Thursday 24 May, European media stakeholders will gather together for a Policy Dialogue lunch event in the European Parliament in Brussels with industry leaders, academics, creative sector representatives and innovators in the field of media. It is a key event addressing media innovation support schemes for the media industry in the upcoming FP9 Framework programme beyond-2020.

 

The European media industry is facing profound digital transformation. Media is fast integrating advances like Artificial Intelligence, Data Analytics, High performance computing, 5G and others while at the same time is called to tackle new challenges like fake news, data security, and role of the global platforms and new concentrations of power, which are also impacting the democratic discourse.

 

In this context, Media Innovation and Research (R&I) has never been so pivotal for the future developments of the sector.

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Take part in Stakeholder Consultation!

MediaRoad has launched Stakeholder Consultation to collect ideas and views from the media sector stakeholders on the future European Research & Innovation Agenda for media sector (with a focus on audio-visual and radio). The collected input will serve as a basis for the development of a common vision for media innovation in Europe that will be included in the first MediaRoad Vision Document.

Go to survey

Are you part of the media industry and in particular of the audio-visual or radio sector?
Are you concerned about its developments and do you want to ensure a bright and innovative future for the sector?

Share your ideas and views on how the future European Research & Innovation Agenda for media should look like and contribute to the creation of a joint vision for media innovation!

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The challenges of fake news and the role of public service broadcasters in communicating Europe: the intake from EuroPCom 2017

Written by Luciano Morganti & Heritiana Ranaivoson

EuroPCom 2017

 

On the 9th and 10th of November 2017, the 8th edition of EuroPCom, the European Public Communication Conference, was held at the Committee of the Regions in Brussels. More than 1000 communication professionals attended the conference which has become, few years since its inception, the ‘must-attend’ annual event for communication managers and experts from local, regional, national and European authorities, as well as, in the most recent editions, academics, researchers and practitioners in the broad field of public and institutional communications.

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